Costume Art in the Noh Theater Community

Keywords: Noh theater, Nōgaku, Noh theater community, Japanese costume, Noh masks, Japanese costume accessories, theater costume collections

Abstract

The article examines costumes in the context of the Noh theater community. The author proposes an understanding of these costumes as part of theatrical practice, as well as a means of sociocultural self-identification, and analyzes representative samples; the most typical motifs, compositional schemes, design approaches are determined. The article also focuses on accessories that make up the ensemble, both for the stage (mask, fan) and off-stage (netsuke, fan, obidome).

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Published
2020-02-16
How to Cite
Rybalko, S. (2020). Costume Art in the Noh Theater Community. Intercultural Relations, 3(2(6), 95-108. https://doi.org/10.12797/RM.02.2019.06.05